Dedicant Oath-Rite Recap

I spoke my Dedicant’s Oath during my grove’s Harvest Home ritual. I completed my full year of High-Day attendance at Midsummer and had originally planned to give my oath during Lughnasadh. But as Lughnasadh approached, I realized I wasn’t going to have all of the required reading done in time. I decided to re-schedule my oath for Harvest Home. In hindsight, this was probably best. Although the Cross-Quarter High Day in August has always been one of my favorites, my grove always celebrates it as a Celtic Rite. Norse may not be my hearth-culture either, but most of the Norse gods are also my gods, so it was a better fit in the end. The patron of the rite was Tyr and the Gatekeeper, Heimdall.

Because I honor seven deities equally in my home practice rather than having a single patron, I gave separate offerings to each as well as to my ancestors and the nature spirits. I felt a little uncomfortable taking up so much time making these offerings. By the time I got around to speaking the oath itself, I felt like I had outstayed my welcome as the center of attention.

There was some confusion concerning when I would be giving the oath during the ritual. I got the impression that the officiant (who was not the senior druid this time) was not even aware that I would be doing my oath that day until I got there. This only increased my anxiety about taking up too much time. I ended up consuming all of eight minutes for my oath and its surrounding activities, which really isn’t all that long, but I felt like it was at the time.

I had all of the words for my praise offerings and the oath memorized. My anxiety about being the center of attention for so long was somewhat alleviated by the fact that I didn’t mess up my words. I brought a print-out of the text with me just in case, but I never needed to consult it. I had pre-planed the order I would give the offerings and the only mistake, if I can call it that, was that I switched the order of two of them. No one in the group could have known, but I picked up the offering for Frigg when I meant to pick up the one for Fréo. As I was about to speak my praise to Fréo, I noticed I had the wrong item in my hands. I froze up on the inside for what felt like a long time, but it wasn’t. To onlookers, everything ran smoothly. I hardly consider myself articulate on an average day, so some muse must have been with me that day to help all the words come out right.

I am especially happy that I have a recording of the whole affair, well most of it anyway. I probably would be writing a much more critical review of myself had I not the video to assess myself from a different perspective. All of the thoughts going through my head would be all I have to go on. I wouldn’t have known that my “very long time” was only 8 minutes. I wouldn’t have known that my words came out more confident-sounding than I perceived them at the time.

My husband was the camera man, as he had been at previous rituals since he, as an agnostic, doesn’t participate in the ritual itself. I always ask that he use my phone to take photos and to film. This time, he used his own phone, which had little space left on it for media. As a result, my post-oath omen-taking was cut off. When he first told me, I thought he missed more than just the omens. I was distraught and let it be known before apologizing to the group for inviting negative energy into the ritual.

I took omen after speaking my oath but before blessing the pendants I had acquired specifically for the purpose. I used my own handmade set of Anglo-Saxon runes to take omen and I asked the following questions:

  • Do the Kindreds accept my oath and sacrifices?
  • What do they offer in return?
  • What more do they ask of me?

The responses were Ger, Tir, and Yr respectively. Ger corresponds to the Elder Futhark Gera and Tir to Tiwaz. Yr is unique to the Anglo-Saxon Futhorc. I took Ger to mean that my oath and sacrifices were accepted but also to be a reminder that my oath is a lifetime commitment. As Tyr was patron of the rite, I took his rune to indicate that the Kindreds offer me their support; that they are present in my life and listening. Amazingly enough, the omen taken by the officiant for the rite as a whole was also Tir/Tiwaz. Tyr was definitely with us that day. Yr indicates that the Kindreds ask me to continue my studies and perhaps specialize in a particular skill set. Yr represents the English longbow, mastery of which, at the time the rune-poem was written, was limited to a select few.

After taking omen, I asked the Kindreds to bless two Thunor’s hammer pendants, one in silver and one in bronze. I got two so that I can always wear one no matter the colors of my outfit. The pendants are modeled after the 6th century hammer found in Kent, England. Up to this point, I had been wearing a Norse Mjölnir, but I wanted something specific to my hearth culture for my oath.

As I wrap up this final essay for my DP documentation, I feel accomplished and amazed that I actually did it all, but I also feel the sweet sorrow that accompanies the completion of any chapter of one’s journey. I may pursue further studies within ADF, in fact, I am almost certain that I will. But not right away. For now, I am going to focus on my hearth practice as it is and appreciate what I have accomplished up to this point.

OATH RITE TEXT:                                                                                                                                           I stand here at the Sacred Center to make an Oath to the Kindreds that I hold most dear to my heart. Beloved Kindreds, hear my call and join me as I offer up these sacrifices and give my oath as an offering in your honor.

 Mighty Ancestors, you of my blood and you of my heart, accept this offering and my good will.

 Noble Ones, Fae of this place, accept this offering and my good will.

 Thunor, Middangeard’s protector, you who has been my guide long before I knew your name, accept my offering.

 Fréo, beautiful Lady, you who has taught me much about self-love and respect, accept my offering.

 Hela, Mistress of the Underworld, you who has motivated me to learn about my ancestors, accept my offering.

 Frige, Queen of Ésengeard, you who encourages me to be self-reliant, accept my offering.

 Móna, shimmering God of the Moon, you who has been there for me in my darkest hours, accept my offering.

 Hrethe, mysterious Lady, you who has taught me never to give up hope, no matter how grim the situation, accept my offering.

 Woden, wise All-Father, you who pushes me to face the hard truths for my own good, accept my offering.

 

 And now, before all in attendance here, I make my oath.

I oath: to keep the feasts and observances of Saxon Druidry, following the Wheel of the Year; to seek the Old Ways and adapt them to modern life; and to keep the memory of my ancestors alive in my heart.

 These things I swear by the well that flows in me, by the fire that shines in me, and by the tree that roots and crowns my soul. Before all the Powers here, I swear it, lest the three Worlds rise against me! Mighty Kindreds, accept my sacrifice and oath!

Omens:

Do the Kindreds accept my offerings? Ger                                                                              

What do they offer me in return? Tir

What more do the they ask of me? Yr

 Finally, I ask that the Powers gathered here bless these þunreslecg pendants as a symbol of my devotion and a reminder of the oath I have made today.

 Oath offerings:

Ancestors – tea

Noble Ones – oatmeal

Frige – home-baked brownie

Mona – Sambuca

Hrethe- ribbon bow in yellow and purple

Woden – rune

Thunor – beer

Freya – ribbon bow

Hela – rose from my rose bush

 

X-Rated Television – a Rant

The following is a hastily written rant initially intended for Facebook until it exceeded a paragraph. Please forgive the lack of structure/grammar/etc.

Why is X-rated television becoming mainstream and everyone is just like, yea cool, whatevs? And the fans of it mock the rest of us for being prudes or not progressive enough for the modern world. Like what the actual hell guys? Are you for real? This isn’t just a matter of nudity on television. Go ahead, support nudity. The whole free-the-nipple thing isn’t my cuppa – but to each their own.

I thought the argument going around these days in support of nudity was for the sake of de-sexulaizing– the human form. I’m pretty sure graphic sex  (especially of the non-vanilla variety) on television not otherwise marketed as porn isn’t helping to that end. Or are you the one who wants to tell me that sex is a part of life and I should accept that? Since when has it been a part of (typical) life to invite an audience into the bedroom? Sex has been a private activity through much of human history, albeit with some exception, but I think you get my point. Heck, even the exceptions have been semi-private. And come on guys, are you all are seriously cool sitting around with your families watching an extended graphic-butt-sex scene on American Gods? No one feels uncomfortable sharing that moment with the fam? I bet some of you shift around in your chairs amongst awkward silence and shifty glances around the room. Voyeuristically watching other people get it on is not a normal form of TV-dinner entertainment. There’s nothing natural about it. It’s creepy.

In forums where I notice people discussing these matters, people question why excessive violence is OK if porn isn’t? That’s like saying, well how come that guy got away with murder but I can’t get away with rape? Obviously “that guy” is also a problem. Pointing out a wrong to justify another wrong is so cliche stupid. The violence on television today far exceeds what used to be rated R and is unnecessarily gratuitous. If it’s going to be torture porn, it needs to be hanging out with the other freaky-graphic horror movies and not advertised as something else. So many times I think I find a good show to watch only to be traumatized by a grossly violent scene I didn’t know to expect – the kind of violence that I only ever saw in horror movies when I was younger.

It’s frustrating that every time I see a trailer for a new show, I need to wait for the parent’s guide to catch up enough to inform me about the context of the show. I shouldn’t have to do this. I am a child-free adult. I shouldn’t have to consult a parents guide to find out if the prime time fantasy or action-hero show I wish to watch is undercover horror or porn. In adult television, I expect violence. In a rated R show, I expect to see full frontal nudity, but I expect something along the lines of The Terminator or Titanic.

But what can I do but sit here and rant about it? And perhaps expect commentary of the unfriendly kind. It’s a bummer to be too liberal for the conservatives and too prudish for the liberals. No one likes me and I think the world is full of morons, so I guess that makes us even. Oh well.

ADF Dedicant Path: Book Review #3

Albertsson, Alaric. Travels through Middle Earth: The Path of a Saxon Pagan. Woodbury, MN: Llewellyn Publications, 2009. Print.

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Travels Through Middle Earth: The Path of a Saxon Pagan provides pagans new to the path with a brief introduction to the practices of modern Anglo-Saxon paganism. While the author, Alaric Albertsson, references ancient practices and history for context, his focus is on modern practice. He is careful to note that the information he presents reflects the practices of his own inhīred (a group of practicing Saxon pagans) and is neither universal, nor indicative of exactly what ancient pagans would have done. Topics covered include cosmology, deities, altar set-up, Holy Tides, ritual format, and mead-making. Although broad rather than deep, the material covered is just enough to get the aspiring Saxon pagan onto his or her feet with a living practice.

The most frequent criticism of this book is of its cursory nature. Indeed, no topic is covered in depth. Instead, the text (hopefully) whets the reader’s appetite for more, provided that Saxon paganism is the right path for them. Someone new to paganism, Saxon paganism, or both is not looking for a heavy coverage of lore and history.

The to-the-point manner of this text is most-likely why it is recommended reading for ADF’s Dedicant Path (DP) program. The DP program does not assume that new members come into it knowing what hearth culture is right for them. This book is intended for those who are initially drawn to or curious about Anglo-Saxon paganism and who would like to get started with active practice right away before delving in deeper.

I appreciate this book for what it is, but by they time I got around to reading it, I was already certain of and decently well-read in my hearth culture. I came into the DP considering Norse, Saxon, and Gaelic hearth cultures. I purchased this book right away along with several others and used it for reference occasionally, but found myself fully immersed in the world of the Saxon pagan long before I picked it up for a proper read-through. For this reason, I sometimes disagreed with Albertsson, but my biases in no way negate the merit of this text. My disagreements were not over matters of fact or “correct” methods. For example, I recognize Hrethe as a different deity than Hertha/Eorðe, while Albertsson introduces her as the as Hertha. Scholars do not agree on this matter, so either view is viable.

Although short on scholarly details, I highly recommend this book to any pagan wishing to get their feet wet with Saxon pagan practices. Lore and history is certainly important, but at the heart of any polytheistic religion is a relationship with the gods, ancestors, and nature spirits. This book will get you started with building such a relationship, while providing just enough detail to set it apart as uniquely Anglo-Saxon.

 

ADF Dedicant Path: Book Review #2

Clifton, Chas S. Her Hidden Children: The Rise of Wicca and Paganism in America. Lanham, MD: AltaMira, 2006. Print.

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Her Hidden Children: The Rise of Wicca and Paganism in America follows the rise of Wicca and other neopagan religions from their beginnings in the early 20th century to the present day, with especial focus on developments in the 1960s and 70s. While the story of Wicca itself is the driving force of the text, Author Chris Clifton could hardly ignore Wicca’s influence on and by other pagan religions, thus resulting in a well-researched comprehensive text chronicling the growth of many of the biggest Neopagan religions to take root in American soil during the 20th century.

This text takes a much needed comparative-studies approach to American pagan practices. Studies of pre-Christian, European pagan religions are necessarily comparative in nature, so too should be the studies of the neopagan religions inspired by them. There is an unfortunate tendency for followers of non-Wiccan pagan paths to distance themselves from Wicca as much as possible. It is this distance which Clifton successfully bridges by demonstrating how Wicca has touched, however indirectly, all American Pagans, from the “traditional” witches claiming a pre-Wiccan lineage to the reconstructionist Heathens who refuse to associate with the broader pagan umbrella, much less Wicca.

Although Clifton gives more attention to some (non-Wiccan) religions than others, with reconstructionist-based paths receiving the least of it, the over-all scope of the text is impressive for its size. Clifton, in fact, addresses this very issue in his introduction by means of a clever island analogy wherein he concludes that “to tell one story . . . is to tell many stories” (4). And hence, the story of Wicca becomes the story of American Paganism. Or rather, the story of a British mystery tradition which makes its way to American soil and evolves into the nature religion we recognize it as today.

I highly recommend this book to all Indo-European-based Neopagans, Wiccan and non-Wiccan alike. Don’t let preconceived notions or biases put you off. I, myself, came to this text with little enthusiasm. Had it not been recommended reading for my Dedicant Path studies, I may never have picked this book up on my own. I hope that my review can convince others not to pass this one by!

The Side of Me No One Knows

I was inspired to write this post after coming across a list of differences between empathy and clairsentience. Apparently traits of one are frequently mixed in with definitions of the other. I almost worried for a moment that I had it wrong, that I’m not an empath at all, only clairsentient. But no, it turns out I am both.

I am a full-time empath and a part time clairsentient. Regarding the latter, there are sometimes I am hyper aware of ~all the things~ to the point of creeping myself out, and other times I am completely tuned out. I don’t have a lot of control over when I am tuned in or out. It just happens.

As for the empath part – I’ve been struggling with this part of my identity for a long time. I grew up introverted and aloof with a history of terrible social etiquette, only to find out later that I have an ASD. I figured empathy was out of the question. People from all walks of my life have told me I lack in that department and I believed it.

As I’ve come into my own and gained increased self-awareness and understanding, I realized that empathy is not what I am lacking, despite having Aspergers. In fact, recent studies have shown that aspies are capable of intense levels of empathic ability. I internalize other’s emotions like nobody’s business. I am also a Highly Sensitive Person (HSP) and have mirror touch synesthesia. I can feel you, I can understand you (though how I get to that understanding might be unconventional as they say INTJ empaths go about it a different way), but there’s no denying that I get it. What I don’t have is the (natural) ability to act on it. I lack the ability to sympathize and comfort. And as I back away from comforting someone, they hurt more and I feel it more. It’s a terrible thing. Some part of me deep inside screams and cries as the emotional tension amplifies, and yet on the outside, my face is stoic. I tell people to man or woman-up. stop whining. leave me alone. I ain’t your shoulder to cry on.

It didnt start out this way. Initially, I retreated without any additional dialog. I played the part of aloof well. But as I learned to accept my supposedly cold and non-empathetic persona, I turned it into a game to cope. I laughed it off. My silence became rude comments which became dry sarcasm. At least the end result doesn’t hurt people as much. They don’t take me seriously, nor do they expect anything from me. Or do they?

The strange thing is, I’ve had a surprising number of people, even some I dont know well, come to me in times of trouble. Why me? Don’t they know I will only make it worse? But they still come, they tell me their problems. I listen. I absorb the pain and leave them with hardly a few words in reply. And still, they return. It makes me immensely uncomfortable. I care, but I don’t know how to show it. All I can do is feel.

My Autism-Spectrum Diagnosis Story

I was nervous about getting my autism spectrum disorder (ASD) diagnosis. What if I didn’t have an ASD at all? what then? But what if I do? Maybe I don’t want that. Maybe I just want to be normal, or at least to believe it. Is it really worth it? What will change in my life after I know?

It was a lot of money for a two-day long analysis. Is two days enough to really evaluate me? It was a LOT of money to spend on a half-assed diagnosis. But my psychologist had good reviews. She specializes in autism, including adults with autism. The latter is a difficult qualification to find. She must know a thing or two.

It would be a few years between first contacting the psychologist and actually going in for an evaluation. I was initially a 2 hour drive away and stressed at the prospect of all that driving plus a long time spent in the office. I finally made the appointment when I lived a little closer, but it was still nearly an hour drive and into the heart of downtown Denver. City driving gives me more anxiety than long distance driving.

But I had to know. I was tired of my assumed ASD being used against me by friends and family when convenient and brushed aside when not. If anyone was going to use it as a weapon, it better at least be a valid one. And then, maybe, I’d feel more confident defending myself because I knew what exactly I was defending.

I found it difficult to behave naturally during the evaluation. I was worried about any of my natural traits coming across as forced or deliberate, even though they weren’t. I didn’t want her to think I was trying one way or another. As a result, I was hyper aware of every little thing I did. By the second day I was worried that I tried so hard to not come across as autistic, that the results would be skewed the other way. But oh well. I trusted that she could see through all that. By the end, I had the impression she wasn’t going to diagnose me with an ASD. We spent so much time discussing traits I had that didn’t quite line up, more so than time spent discussing the ones that did. And yet, her final assessment was, yes, I am definitely on the spectrum. I have what would have been labeled Aspergers before it was lumped into the larger ASD diagnosis.

I felt relieved when it was over. I had the words on paper to serve as evidence of my feat. I was so proud of myself, I did it. I survived the city, and the unfamiliar environment. And I survived it twice! I am not good with multiple big events happening too close in proximity. I need a lot of down time between activities outside the home that aren’t part of my usual routine. But I was a real trooper this time.

After the novelty wore off, life went back to normal. Only, now when my ASD is used against me, I can’t reply with “you don’t know that.” But, hey, on the bright side (I thought), when people give me grief about not fitting in with standard social customs, my excuses won’t be taken so personally. Maybe this will improve my relationships, maybe now I can start making real friends. I can say I don’t feel up to going out for multiple invites in a row and it won’t be perceived as rude. Now I can decline hugs without hurting people’s feelings. Now I can say something makes me uncomfortable and people will take me seriously. Unfortunately, none of this is the case. Others only acknowledge my ASD when they can use it as an insult. Otherwise, it is the same invisible disability it was before my diagnosis.

—Please, don’t make that sound —Oh, OK sorry

—Don’t touch me there. —Ok

—this aesthetic makes me uncomfortable —*shrug*

Some time later:

—I said I don’t like that, please, don’t —OK

and later again:

—Why wont you listen!! Stop, please! —woah! Chill out! Jeez. Wait, you were being serious?? I didn’t know it was such a big deal…

Yes, it’s a big deal. These aren’t petty complaints or preferences. I get surges of adrenaline when I see or feel certain things. To make matters worse, I have mirror-touch synesthesia. I’m really not messing around when I say something bothers me. It really IS a big deal. Why won’t anyone take me seriously?

And yet, I know why. I don’t look like anything is wrong with me. I’m not physically handicapped, I don’t have the physical traits that show themselves in conjunction with other mental disorders, I don’t act particularly unusual in most settings. People expect that I can control my mind the way they expect people with depression to do the same. —Just get over it! Mind over matter…

I wish I could. Sometimes I can manage better than others. My spiritual practices have been helping immensely. Especially meditation and breathing techniques. I haven’t had a serious meltdown in several years. I have a pretty good idea of what I can handle and what I cannot, so I plan my days accordingly. But I don’t always have control over my surroundings. And I can’t just get over it.

My friends try to understand. But I don’t think they really do. I still hurt feelings. I know they are human and that theoretical understanding of my situation doesn’t change how my actions affect them. I wish it didn’t have to be like this. All I can do is spread awareness. Perhaps if enough of us share our experiences, the rest of the world will believe that they are indeed real.

ADF Dedicant Path: Book Review #1

I’ve been putting off the book-review portion of the DP for some time now. I was/am not sure if I still plan to submit my essays for official approval, so it hasn’t been a priority. But I haven’t been writing anything else on my blog recently, so I figured I may as well write a book review.

Jones, Prudence, and Nigel Pennick. A History of Pagan Europe. London: Routledge,an Imprint of Taylor & Francis, 2011. Print.

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A History of Pagan Europe gives a broad but detailed overview of the culture, politics, and religious practices of pagans in Europe before Christian conversion. The book is organized more or less by geographical region. The focus varies from region to region, with some chapters focusing more on religious practices and others on politics, but the overall effect is a picture of how these and culture as a whole are interrelated. The authors’ primary aim, besides documenting history, is to examine how some pagan practices have survived the centuries relatively unchanged despite political opposition and forced religious conversion.

Perhaps the most notable aspect of this book is its holistic approach to history. Anthropology, sociology, religious studies, and the cold hard facts of history come together to provide a vibrant glimpse into times long gone. This book is of value to both academics and neopagans alike. Although neopagans do not live in the same time as pre-Christian pagans, it is important that they have an understanding of the context from which the practices they immerse themselves in today come. It is easier to adapt old customs to modern life if we understand their original purpose. And since the purpose of religious customs cannot be separated from culture and politics, knowledge of these is also essential.

Having a long and arduous academic history (in comparative literature among other subjects), this book was not especially eye-opening to me, but I did gain some insight none the less. A lot of it was review, but review of things that I had forgotten. I had a basic understanding of the interconnectedness of all Indo-European religions, but it was fascinating to read the particulars, like a puzzle coming together. For example, I know the number nine is significant in Germanic paganism and is a multiple of three, which is significant to the Celts, but I learned from this book about a Romanian ceremony that lasted nine days and involved nine boundary points (190). It was the random, seemingly trivial facts like these that were of the most interest to me in this text.

I recommend this book to all neo-pagans interested in an European-based pagan spirituality. It isn’t a quick read, but it is worth the effort. A lot of information is contained in the 200+ pages. I ended up reading though the book twice. The first time was a speed-read in order to form an outline in my head to fill in during the second read-through. It may also be helpful to keep a notebook on hand to write down important dates, events, and names, since the book jumps around a lot in time and some names recur often enough that it is helpful to have a reference point. For those lucky few with a superb short term memory, notes may still come in handy for future research endeavors. Regardless of how one choses to tackle this book, s/he will not regret it!

Deviant INTJ (or am I?)

Long time no post! Sorry guys. I keep doing that to you. I’m going to do my best to get onto a regular posting schedule next year. If any of you can suggest some fun blog prompts or yearly blog challenges, I would love to hear them. I was all on top of things when I had the DP work to do. But now that’s over, more or less. I haven’t posted the book reports yet because I feel accomplished enough with my spirituality that it hasn’t been a priority. Sounds very INTP of me though doesn’t it? Dropping a task as soon as I near completion to  start something else? Well, INTP isn’t one of my possible types, but this does lead me quite nicely into the topic I mean to blog about right now.

I’ve been defending my INTJ status for a few years now. Nevertheless, I don’t fit into the INTJ box very well. If I did, I wouldn’t fee the need to keep defending my place in it. But every so often, I start to question myself. Could I be an INFJ? Drop the INFJ bomb in any INTJ forum and they will immediately go to the standard script: INTJs don’t question their type. More INFJs are mistyped as INTJ than vice versa. The mere fact that I am questioning my type must mean I am not INTJ. Perhaps. There certainly is a correlation. Other facts and correlations that don’t work in my favor include being  female and former female INTJ Youtubers revealing that they are really INFJ. But if we can just put aside these quick-solution correlations for a moment and look at the facts of my particulate situation, that’d be great.

I have been told that I am intimidating as many times as I have been accused of being personable. But there is a clear differentiation of context for each identity. When I am doing customer service work such as tech support or cashiering, I am always labeled the most personable employee. Customers seek me out on purpose because I am the “nice one.” This has been consistent across the board in every job I’ve ever held. Get me out of my day job and the friendly facade is gone just like that. Not that I am necessarily mean, but the immediately approachable persona is no longer there.  I become an acquired taste. When people get to know me, they no longer fear me and they even come to me with their problems from time to time for advice or just an ear to listen.

Watching my youtube videos, I have a hard time figuring out what it is that intimidates people. Truth be told, I wish I was intimidating. It’s an aspect of INTJness that I like to play up, but when I watch myself in action, I laugh at how stupid I come across. How in the world can anyone find that mess of derp intimidating? I discussed this with my husband and he said that my youtube persona doesn’t match how I behave most of the time out in the wild. I really want to believe it. But I have no idea how I really come across except that people have told me they don’t know how to approach me, so there must be something to it.

My behavior has also changed with age. I go out of my way to avoid conflict and to try, albeit poorly, to be a peace keeper. This is normal. People change as they mature and some develop their tertiary functions more than others. Could this be my issue? Do I have a super-developed Fi? Maybe, but this still wouldn’t explain why I try to avoid conflict. Fe is the one that bases morals on societal norms and tries to adjust their behavior to harmonize with the group. But is it even harmonizing that I do? If I was harmonizing so well, people wouldn’t be intimidated. Before I was 18, I had no intuition for group dynamics and social queues. I was so Aspie it’s embarrassing to remember. I did what I wanted as I wanted to with no regard for how it affected others. I was completely oblivious to the social atmosphere around me. I cringe remembering some of the horrible things I’ve done in the past, now that I can understand the big picture in hind sight.  Today, I excel at picking up group dynamics and it surprises me how natural it has become. However, I don’t pick them up right away. There is a processing delay. I don’t get those famous INFJ vibes  in a room the minute I walk in. But I can analyze the landscape fairly quickly. Once I do, I will try my best not to make waves.

I enjoy debate and any excuse to have discussions about hot topics, but only with select people who also aren’t wave makers. I might attempt to speak my mind from the beginning in an unfamiliar group, but the minute someone takes it personally, I back off. I don’t go around proactively trying to create harmony, but I make sure I personally am not involved in the discord. In fact, it has occurred to me that conflict around me doesn’t bother me. It only bothers me if I know I am somehow involved.

While (I think) I am blending in externally, my personal moral code is not Fe driven. I disagree with so many traditional norms and morals it’s crazy. I have my own sense of morality, but no desire to impose it on anyone. I privately judge everyone while behaving cordial. I believe in “to each their own”; live and let live. I might not agree with you, but if you stay out of my way, I’ll stay out of yours.

I read a blog post about sympathetic INTJs and it struck a chord with me. Especially this part:

While I understand people on an extreme level, I don’t feel their emotions the way an Fe user would. My Ni lets me know intuitively what’s going on behind the lines and then I’m able to logically put together what someone is feeling by using Te. I can understand, but I cannot empathize unless I have shared experience.

I call myself an empath from time to time because I do think that I can understand people deeply and even feel their emotions. But only if it relates to a shared experience. I can reason out just about any emotion, but if I can’t relate to it, I won’t internalize it. I have a hard time imagining what it must be like for empaths who claim to internalize emotions no matter the situation.

I read elsewhere that:

[INTJ]s feel uncomfortable with overt displays of emotion, because for them, feelings are highly personal and private. When an INTJ is approached with a personal problem, the INTJ’s first reaction is to treat it like a challenge to be solved. In lieu of emotional support, the INTJ may offer practical solutions.

While I certainly do enjoy helping out a friend in distress, it’s definitely more of a puzzle than an emotional event for me. I love the accolades for solving the problem, but I don’t do emotional support. I want to and wish I could and I hate myself that I don’t, but I can’t handle displays of emotion. Internally, I care deeply when it’s someone in my inner circle; externally, I come across as impersonal and indifferent. When I try to provide emotional support it comes across as fake, cold, forced, or awkward to the point of comedy. In some rare cases, people have told me I was plenty emotionally supportive, so perhaps my efforts can read as I intend them, but they do not come to me naturally or feel natural when I enact them.

Moving on from all the feelzy talk, my “T” also doesn’t fit squarely in the INTJ box. On all cognitive function tests, my Te and Ti are nearly identical. I spend a lot of time in my head, but so do other INTJs apparently. In this case, I think I am misunderstanding Te and Ti rather than using both equally. I am the type to correct details and grammar in others’ speech. I question what others perceive as trivial details, whereas an INTJ is only supposed to be concerned with the big picture. I want the big picture and the details, but the latter only on my terms. I cannot stand people who take forever to get to the point. I will be rude and ask them to get to the point or point out if something has already been stated. If they say a detail I notice as false, I call them on it immediately. I do this to my husband all the time and he hates it. He’ll say something happened on a particular day of the week, for example, and I’ll volunteer empirical data to prove that it couldn’t have happened then. He gets frustrated not knowing why I should even care, since the day it happened wasn’t essential to the story being told. At the same time, I constantly accuse him of taking too long to get to the point. I don’t want fluff details. If the date was never mentioned, I wouldn’t have asked for it. But if an inaccurate detail is placed there, relevant or not, I’ll call you on it. Why insert a random fluff detail if it’s not imperative to the point —especially if it’s not even accurate? This drives me nuts. I have been confusing this as a Ti attention to detail when I’m not so sure that’s really what it is. I will request details as I deem them relevant, but I don’t like the speaker to volunteer any more than necessary up front. I prefer to seek the big picture first and then go back to retrieve details. Still, I do enjoy thinking about stuff purely for the sake of thinking about it with no practical purpose in mind except for logical satisfaction. This is a Ti thing, isn’t it?

The most frustrating thing of it is, I want to be unique. Individuality is a priority for me, but I also want to fit neatly into a box. What even is that? I want a box and don’t want one at the same time? Ok, I do know. I want a box that’s pre-defined but not too crowded.

Results of my most recent cognitive function test are as follows. For the time being, I am still (a deviant) INTJ.

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But why am I all whimsical and airy fairy and into the occult and magickal stuff? That’s more INFJ. But the “counselor” personality? No way. I do not go out of my way to help people. If I know you well, and I respect you, then yes, of course. I would absolutely hate to be a therapist. Strangers do not concern me. I wish them well, but I don’t want their baggage on me.

Let us Tend the World Hearth Flame

I have a candle that was lit at the Brigid Shrine in Kildare. I received it as a gift from my Grove last Imbolc. I haven’t done anything with it until now. I wasn’t sure what to do with it. I know it is sacred, something special, something I needed to hold onto. But my hearth culture is Anglo Saxon and Brigid is not one of my patrons. Today, however, as I was thinking about the post-election stress, about friends and family dividing over politics, about issues that I feel so small standing up against. I thought of that Brigid candle and felt strongly compelled to light it. A candle that holds the energy of a shrine to which both Christians and Pagans make pilgrimages. A place that unites people despite their differences; dedicated to a Goddess (or Saint) of inspiration, healing, and the hearth-flame among other things.

Brigid seemed like exactly the Goddess to call upon for matters beyond my personal needs. She is not my personal patron, but she is a one that my Grove honors and she is one I will now call on whenever I wish to light a candle for others. Her flame, to me, represents the hearth flame of the world. A hearth that unites rather than divides. We can and should still have our independent hearth cults. But it is never a good idea to segregate oneself so much that the “other” becomes the enemy.

The Earth Mother is host to the World Hearth, and Brigid is one of the deities I believe tends to it. In recognition of this, I dressed a new candle with Cypress oil to be lit with the flame from my original Brigid candle. Cypress oil is my ritual oil for Imbolc, the Holy Tide when I honor the Earth mother and, with my Grove, Brigid. I then invited Brigid to my devotional and told her my intentions.

I was nervous inviting a new deity to my private rituals. Although I honor Brigid in group ritual, I did not know how she would take to me asking so much from her privately. I lit the candle and spoke my prayers without any expectation. I prayed that she might inspire people in whatever way necessary to unite them despite their differences. I asked if she might lend her healing energy to my grandfather in-law who recently broke his hip and to my friends and family who are suffering from broken relationships in the aftermath of election day. I offered wine and I took an omen. I asked her if my request was received favorably. Her response?  The rune, Gyfu (aka Gebo), which means “gift.” I have heard it said that Brigid rewards all offerings to her. Perhaps this omen was confirmation of this. A gift calls for a gift. I offered her wine, but I also offered my love. My love for my family, friends, my country, and the world. My love that I give irregardless of others’ religions, politics, and identities. The omen I received in return yielded a sigh of relief from me.

Please, people, try to put love first. Don’t go immediately into battle while filled with rage. Try to see yourself in your would-be enemies. Try to understand their side. Ask yourselves if hate is really the answer right now. And, like I have said before in this post, do not think that condescending or smug language is going to be met with open ears. I know you are mad. I know you think you are right. But only respectful dialogue can bring another to consider your point of view.

Etsy Store Progress

Sorry guys, I’m really leaving you all hanging aren’t I? But I’m quite flattered that I haven’t lost most of my followers yet!

I’m doing a lot better keeping up with my youtube channel than I am my blog. So, hey, if you wanna watch and listen to me ramble for longer than necessary about stuff, feel free to subscribe to me there if you haven’t already!

TheAspiePagan Youtube Channel

Most of my time lately has been spent preparing for the January opening of my Etsy store. I’ve been setting up my mini workshop, taking classes at the local Tandy leather to freshen up old skills and learn some new, watching hundreds of youtube tutorials for ideas and inspiration, experimenting with possible designs and working out logistics for practical marketing.

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My Workspace

I’ve pretty much narrowed down what will be my two primary journal styles. I will also be making dreamcatchers with tooled leather centers and possibly some more traditional ones too. I simply adore dreamcatchers and I had to fit them in somehow.

Because I don’t want to limit the future expansion of my product line and because I also don’t want to end up with a random mashup of unrelated stuff, I had to think long and hard about the marketing. I was struggling to figure out how to even tie dreamcatchers and journals together in a way that makes sense. Besides the obvious, but severely limiting dream-journal concept, including the dreamcatchers as part of an overall “leather craft” theme also doesn’t work incase I decide to create leather-free ones as well.

What I know is that I want all my designs to inspire people and to make dreamers out of them. That I even have this amazing opportunity to work full-time as an artisan is an amazing dream come true and I want to inspire others to follow their dreams too. Or to at least to not lose their childlike wonder for the world and all it’s possibilities. So I came up with the following tagline: “Whimsical crafts to inspire the dreamer in you.” I thought it was a clever way to keep “dreams” in there without limiting the definition. Most of my items will have witchy, pagan, or otherwise whimsical designs and themes.

Oh yeah, and sorry too that I’m taking so long to get those book reports posted. It will happen though. I promise!

 

 

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